Not your Grandma’s scones.

Dare I say it, traditional scones are terrible. My family has passed down a recipe through generations, each scone as dry and boring as the next (sorry, Grandma!).

My Aunt, however, knew that scones should be lively and moist, like a shortcake. Single-handedly, she redeemed our family recipe and changed scones forever. 

Presenting the reinvented recipe as learned from the pro herself.

  

Step One: Choose Your Scone

Every scone needs some flavour. Here are some classic mix-in options:

  • Raisins
  • Butterscotch chips
  • Chocolate chips
  • Shredded cheddar with chives
  • Blueberries (pro tip: add lemonzest!)

Remember that scones can be the weapon ofchoice when helping family fight a bad day, sickness or stressful project. Myaunt will take note of each person’s favourite flavour and bake those speciallyto show people she loves them and are thinking about them.





Step Two: Prepare Yourself

Preheat your oven to 425℉. Before beginning, lay out everything you will need for this recipe:

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 tbsp baking powder
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ½ tsp salt
  • 2 tbsp sugar
  • 1 egg
  • 1 stick butter (must be room temperature)
  • 1 cup sour cream       
  • A fork, a long knife (bread knife works great)
  • 1 cup of mix-ins (from step one)
  • Two bowls (one medium/large, one small)
  • Baking sheet lined with parchment paper
  • Jar or Tupperware (optional)

Make sure everything is within reach. This lets you get the scones in the oven right away and makes the clean-up quick and easy.

 

Step Three: Add Dry Ingredients

In the medium/large bowl, add your flour, baking soda, baking powder, sugar and salt. Mix.

If you pre-portion the dry ingredients for next time you can whip up the scones in a hurry when needed. Surprise visitor? Scones. Hungover guests? Scones. Sad after Greys Anatomy? Scones!

 

Step Four: Mix Gently

Use your fork to mash the butter against the side of your bowl and into the dry ingredients until there is no bit of butter bigger than a pea.

Sprinkle your mix-in (blueberries, etc.) over the dry ingredients.

In a small bowl mix together the sour cream and egg. Add this mixture to your dry ingredients and mesh everything together to form a dough-like texture.

I can hear my aunt now:

“The lightest and fluffiest scones are handled the least.”

If you take one thing from this recipe, make it be this: do not over-handle the batter! Try using your hands to mix the sour cream and egg into the dry ingredients, you are much gentler than any utensil.

 

Step Five: Shape and Divide

Take all of the dough into your hands and move it onto the lined baking sheet. Form it into a loaf of bread-like shape and size.

Use your long knife to cut the loaf in half lengthwise so that you have two skinny loaves. Then, turn your knife 90° and cut it in half the other way. Cut each half in half again. You now should have eight equal sections. Cut each section in half once more (as per the photo).Arrange the 16 scones evenly on your baking sheet.

Though you want them to be relatively even in terms of size, they don’t need to be exactly the same. Don’t bother shaping them into the round, flat shape of a traditional scone. These are absolutely not yo grandma’s scones!

 

Step Six: Bake and Serve

Put the baking sheet on the middle rack of your oven. The scones take approximately 10 minutes based on your oven. Take them out when they turn golden brown on the top.


This work was created as a part of a project for Humber’s Professional Writing and Communication program. The goal was to write an article that explains how to do something step by step. 

Posted by:Erin O'Neill

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